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  • Staff and Field Presentation Sword Surgeon James D. McClure, 84th & 147th PA Volunteer Infantry

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    Staff and Field Presentation Sword Surgeon James D. McClure, 84th & 147th PA Volunteer Infantry - Inventory Number: SWO 096

    Staff and Field Presentation Sword of Surgeon James D. McClure, blade is acid etched: "General Bank's Body Guard"

    84th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 147th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry

    Sword is marked by a scarce retailer: W. Willard & J. D. Hawley of Syracuse, N. Y., on an etched panel on the ricasso.  This form was one of many jewelers and fancy-good dealers that during the Civil War sold swords, military belts, sashes, headgear and other fancy goods for the discerning Union officers.  The blade depicts a series of patriotic panels including a large "U.S." a Union officer standing upon a parapet waving a flag, a star, and a panel reading: "Victor".  Blade bears an acid-etched inscription: "Capt. JAS D. McClure - Gen. Banks Body Guard".

    Guard exhibits a nice even bronze patina with U.S. cut-out and detailed floral scrolls, the pebbled grip is sound and the original wire wrap is tight.  Affixed to the guard is an old brass museum inventory tag with the number "107".  The curved blade had deep etching and legible retailers marking.  The brass mounted scabbard had a pleasing patina on the mounts with a pair of breaks in the leather.  

    Surgeon James D. McClure was present at numerous engagements including the Battle of Gettysburg.

    James D. McClure:

    Enlisted on 9/13/1862 as a Asst Surgeon.

    On 9/13/1862 he was commissioned into Field & Staff PA 84th Infantry 

    He was discharged for promotion on 5/14/1863

    On 5/14/1863 he was commissioned into Field & Staff PA 147th Infantry 

    He was discharged for disability on 11/18/1863

    Promotions:

    * Surgeon 5/14/1863


    PENNSYLVANIA 84TH INFANTRY (Three Years)

         Eighty-fourth Infantry.-Cols., William G. Murray, Samuel M. Bowman; Lieut.-Cols., Thomas C. MacDowell, Walter Barrett, Thomas H. Craig, Milton Opp, George Zinn; Majs,. Walter Barrett, Thomas H. Craig, Milton Opp, George Zinn, Samuel Bryan.  The 84th regiment, composed of men from the counties of Blair, Lycoming, Clearfield, Dauphin, Columbia' Cameron and Westmoreland, was recruited in the late summer and early fall of 1861.  It rendezvoused first at Camp Crossman, Huntingdon, and afterwards at Camp Curtin, Harrisburg, where it was organized towards the close of October, and before the end of the year all the men were mustered into the U. S. service for three years.  On Dec. 31, 1861, it left for Hancock, Md., and on its arrival there on Jan. 2, 1862, crossed the Potomac and moved to Bath.  Here it was confronted by the enemy under Stonewall Jackson and fell back to Hancock, moving thence to Cumberland.  During the remainder of the winter the command was posted along the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, but in March, it moved to Winchester, where it was heavily engaged as a part of the forces commanded by Gen. Shields.  Its loss in the battle was 23 killed and 67 wounded out of 260 engaged.  Col. Murray, Capt. Gallagher and Lieut. Reem were among the killed. It served on provost duty at Berryville until May 2; skirmished on the 31st at Front Royal; was again engaged at Port Republic in June; then remained encamped at Alexandria until July, when under the commend of Col. Bowman it joined Pope's army, and was assigned to Carroll's brigade, Ricketts' division, McDowell's corps.  It was only slightly engaged at Cedar mountain, but fought bravely throughout the day at the second battle of Bull Run.  Only a fragment of the regiment was fit for duty when it reached Washington, and on account of its reduced condition it remained at Arlington Heights during the Antietam campaign.  While here its ranks were filled by about 400 recruits and returning convalescents.  At Fredericksburg it formed part of Gen. Whipple's independent division and with its brigade rendered conspicuous service during the battle.  When Gen. Hooker took command of the army, the 84th was assigned to the 2nd brigade (Col. Bowman), 3rd division (Gen. Whipple), 3rd corps (Gen. Sickles).  Its losses were very heavy at the battle of Chancellorsville, being 219 out of 391 engaged.  Despite its own heavy losses it succeeded in bringing off 33 prisoners.  The 84th now became a part of Gen. Carr's brigade of the 2nd corps.  In the Gettysburg campaign it was detailed to guard the corps train and did not share in the great battle.  In the Virginia campaign which ensued it was active at Wapping heights, Thoroughfare gap, Freeman's ford, Bristoe Station, Kelly's ford, Jacob's ford, Locust Grove and Mine run, and then went into winter quarters at Brandy Station.  Many of the command reenlisted in Jan., 1864, and were given a veteran furlough.  It assisted in driving the enemy at Morton's ford, Va., in February, and shared with the 2nd corps in the almost constant fighting from the Wilderness to the James.  Lieut-Col. Opp was mortally wounded at the Wilderness while bravely leading a charge, and in a skirmish at Pleasant hill the gallant Lieut. Nixon, who saved the command from capture at Bull Run, was severely wounded.  It shared in the siege of Petersburg until June 27, when it recrossed the James and took part in the action at Deep Bottom.  It then reengaged in the work of the siege until Aug. 14, when it was again in action at Deep Bottom and Strawberry Plains.  Once more it returned to the work of the siege, was engaged at Yellow tavern, where Lieut.-Col. Zinn was severely wounded, and in October the original members, except veterans and recruits, were mustered out of service. The others were organized as a battalion of four companies,which were consolidated on Jan. 13, 1865, with the 57th Pa. and served with that regiment until the end of the war.  The battalion shared in the engagement of the 2nd corps at Hatcher's run in October, and was again engaged on the Weldon railroad in December.  The history of the battalion after its consolidation is the same as that of the 57th (q. v.).  It was finally mustered out of service with that organization on June 29, 1865.

    Gettysburg after battle report: 

      Report of Lieut. Col. Milton Opp, Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry.

      Bivouac near Warrenton, Va., July 30, 1863.

      Sir: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the Eighty-fourth Regt. Pennsylvania

      Volunteers, from June 11 to July 8:

      June 11.--Received marching orders at Stoneman's Switch at 9 a. m. to report to the commanding officer Third Brigade, Second Division, Third Corps.  Reported, and were ordered to join the brigade on the march to Hartwood Church, Va., where we arrived at 8 p. m.; 8 miles.

      June 12.--Marched at 6 a. m.; arrived at Rappahannock Station at 8 p. m.; 23 miles.

      June 13.--Engaged in throwing up earthworks and demolishing railroad bridge.

      June 14.--Performed picket duty on the bank of the river until 9 p. m., when we received orders to join the First Brigade, Second Division, Third Corps, and marched all night, arriving near Manassas Junction at 12 m. on the 15th; 28 miles.

      June 16.--Moved at 1 p. m. 1 mile toward Bull Run, and bivouacked.

      June 17.--Marched at 10 a. m., crossing Bull Run, and bivouacked near Centreville; 5 miles.

      June 18.--Moved camp 1 mile, near the wagon park.  Companies

      F, G, and part of H were sent on picket, and, on being relieved, took the wrong road, and did not join us until the 23d, at Gum Springs, having marched to Leesburg, expecting to meet the regiment there.

      June 19.--Marched to Gum Springs; 10 miles.

      June 25.--Marched at 7 a. m. via Edwards Ferry, arriving at the mouth of the Monocacy at 12 p. m.; 25 miles.

      June 26.--Marched at 9 a. m., arriving at Point of Rocks at 4 p.m.; 6 miles.

      June 27.--Marched at 8 a. m., arriving at Burkittsville, Md.; 12 miles.

      June 28.--Marched at 9 a. m. via Frederick City; 18 miles.

      June 29.--Marched at 5 a. m., arriving at Taneytown, Md., at 4 p. m.; 18 miles.

      June 30.--Was detailed to guard wagon train of the Second Division, Third Corps.  Reported the regiment to Capt. Johnston, assistant quartermaster Second Division, at the train at Taneytown, Md.  Picketed the roads near the train.

      July 1.--Moved with the train 4 miles on the road to Emmitsburg; then returned and marched all night with train to Westminster, Md., arriving at 7 a. m. on the 2d; 25 miles.

      July 2 to 4.--Picketing roads near the wagon parks.

      July 5.--Picketing roads and loading supply trains.

      July 6.--Marched with train to Uniontown; 12 miles.

      July 7.--Marched with train to Frederick City, Md.; 24 miles.

      July 8.--Marched to Middletown, Md.; 8 miles.

      Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

      MILTON OPP,  Lieut.-Col., Comdg. Regt.

      Capt. Le Grand Benedict, Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Brig., Second Div., Third Corps.

      Report of Col. Milton Opp, Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry.

      CAMP NEAR BRANDY STATION, VA.,

      December 4, 1863.

      SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of this regiment, in connection with the First Brigade, Second Division, Third Corps, from the 26th of November to the 3d of December.

     1863, inclusive:

      November 26.--Marched at sunrise to the Rapidan, crossing at Jacobs' Ford, going 3 miles on the other side, and bivouacking.

      November 27.--Marched at sunrise 2 miles and met the enemy, engaging him in line of battle from 1 p.m. until dark, and bivouacking on the field in line.

      November 28.--Marched forward to feel the position of the enemy at 5 a.m., and, finding him gone, marched to the left, via Robertson's Tavern, and bivouacked near Mine Run.

      November 29.--Moved toward our left 1 mile, and bivouacked.

      November 30.--Moved at 4 a.m. to our extreme left, and formed in line in front of the enemy's works, remaining until dark, when we moved back to the center and bivouacked.

      December 1.--Marched down the Orange and Fredericksburg plank road to Parker's Store to support General Gregg's cavalry, and bivouacked.

      December 2.--Marched as rear guard, at daylight, to the Rapidan, crossing at Culpeper Ford and bivouacking.

      December 3.--Marched at 8 a.m. to Brandy Station, arriving at our old camp at 4 p.m.

      Casualties in the engagement near Jacobs' Ford, on the Rapidan, November 27, 1863: Wounded, 1 officer and 8 men; missing, 1 officer and 4 men.*

      I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

      MILTON OPP,  Lieut. Col. 48th Pa. Vols., Comdg. Regiment.

      Lieut. Jos. H. CHASE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

      Report of Lieut. Col. George Zinn, Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry.

      HDQRS. EIGHTY-FOURTH Regt. PENNSYLVANIA VOLS., August 7, 1864.

      SIR: In obedience to paragraph 3, Special Orders, No. 104, headquarters Second Brigade, Third Division, Second Corps, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers in the several operations of the present campaign:

    FIRST EPOCH.

      The regiment, in conjunction with the Second Corps and Army of the Potomac generally, broke camp on the evening of the 3d day of May, 1864, and marched to the Rapidan, crossing at Ely's Ford. Camped late in the afternoon of the 4th on the old battle-ground of Chancellorsville. 5th, marched to the Wilderness and took position on the left of the Sixth Corps, about a quarter of a mile to the left of the plank road leading to Orange Court-House, and threw up breast-works. Took part in the battles of the 5th and 6th. Loss, 2 officers and 46 enlisted men-1 commissioned officer wounded, 1 commissioned officer missing, 5 enlisted men killed, 41 enlisted men wounded.

    SECOND EPOCH.

      8th, marched to Todd's Tavern, threw up breast-works, and drew ammunition and rations. 10th, marched to near Spotsylvania Court-House and had a skirmish with the enemy on the Ny River. 12th, took part in the engagement in front of Spotsylvania Court-House, losing 1 officer and 38 enlisted men-1 commissioned officer wounded, 8 enlisted men killed, and 30 enlisted men wounded.

    THIRD EPOCH.

      21st, marched to and across the Mattapony, passing through Bowling Green and Milford Station. Took position and threw up breastworks. 23d, marched to the North Anna River; engaged the enemy, driving them across the river and held the Jericho Bridge. 24th, crossed the river and skirmished with the enemy, losing 6 enlisted men-1 killed and 5 wounded.

    FOURTH EPOCH.

      27th, recrossed the river and marched to the Pamunkey River, crossing near Hanovertown, and threw up breast-works. 29th, advanced about 1 mile and erected another line of works. 31st and 1st of June, engaged the enemy on the Totopotomoy Creek; lost 3 officers and 18 enlisted  men. June 2d, marched to Cold Harbor and participated in the various engagements at that place, losing 4 commissioned officers wounded, 4 enlisted men killed, 16 enlisted men wounded, and 3 enlisted men missing.*

    Respectfully, your obedient servant,

      GEORGE ZINN,  Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Regt.

      Capt. F. E. MARBLE,  Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

    Reports of Lieut. Col. George Zinn, Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry.

      HDQRS. EIGHTY-FOURTH Regt. PENNSYLVANIA VOLS.,

     August 7, 1864.

      SIR:*

      FIFTH EPOCH.

     [June] 12th to 15th, marched to and across the James River, crossing the Chickahominy at Long Bridge and the James at Wilcox's Landing. 15th, marched to the outer line of the enemy's works in front of Petersburg, which had this day, been carried by the colored troops; took position on the left of the Eighteenth Corps. 16th and 21st, was engaged with the enemy, losing 2 officers and 23 enlisted men-3 enlisted men were killed and 2 commissioned officers and 20 enlisted men wounded. 21st to 26th, was lying in front of Petersburg, engaged in picket and fatigue duty.

    July 26, marched toward the James River, crossing the Appomattox at Point of Rocks and the James at Deep Bottom. Skirmished with the enemy on the 27th and 28th; recrossed the James on the evening of the 28th, and the Appomattox the same night. Relieved the Eighteenth Corps on the 29th, and was relieved by the Eighteenth Corps on the night of the 30th, and returned to our old camp.

    Total loss, 9 commissioned officers and 136 enlisted men-8 commissioned officers wounded, 1 commissioned officer missing, 21enlisted men killed, 112 enlisted men wounded, and 3 enlisted men missing.

    Respectfully, your obedient servant,

    GEORGE ZINN,

    Lieut. Col. Eighty-fourth Regt. Pennsylvania Vols., Cmdg. Regt.

    Capt. F. E. MARBLE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Second Brigade.

    HDQRS. EIGHTY-FOURTH PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS,

      September 25, 1864.

      SIR: In compliance with circular of the 24th instant, I have the honor to submit the following statement of the part taken by this command from the 26th to the 31st of July, 1864, inclusive:

      About 5 o'clock on the afternoon of the 26th this regiment, in conjunction with the Second Brigade, took our line of march from camp on the left of the army in front of Petersburg, Va., for the north bank of the James River. Crossed the Appomattox River at Point of Rocks about 1 a. m. on the 27th, and the James at Deep Bottom at daybreak. Here we formed line of battle and advanced about one mile and a half in a northeasterly direction, where we halted and remained during the night. On the morning of the 28th moved a short distance to the left and threw up breast-works. About dark we withdrew, recrossed the James, and marched toward the left of our lines, halting in rear of the Eighteenth Corps about sunrise on the morning of the 29th. At dark we advanced to and occupied the front line of works, relieving a part of the Eighteenth Corps. Remained here until the evening of the 30th, when we were relieved, and marched to our old camp, arriving there on the morning of the 31st.

    Respectfully, your obedient servant,

    GEORGE ZINN, Lieut. Col. Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Vols., Cmdg. Regt.

    Capt. J. B. TEN EYCK, Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Second Brigade.

    Report of Lieut. Col. George Zinn, Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations August 15-16.

    HDQRS. EIGHTY-FOURTH Regt. PENNSYLVANIA VOLS.,

      August 21, 1864.

      SIR: In obedience to circular of the 18th instant, I have the honor to submit the following brief statement of the part taken by this regiment in the engagements north of the James River on the 15th and 16th instant:

    On the morning of the 15th the regiment, in conjunction with the Second Brigade, Third Division, Second Corps (temporarily attached to the Tenth Army Corps), marched from the extreme right of the Tenth Corps in the direction of the Charles City road. We came up with the skirmish line of the Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalry, who had been engaging the enemy earlier in the morning, at Mrs. Craddock's house. Here a line of battle was immediately formed. Preparatory to advancing, the First Regt. U. S. Sharpshooters was thrown forward as skirmishers, covering the front of the brigade. The Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers was on the right of the line of battle, and was joined on the left by the First Regt. Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. The regiment had advanced but a short distance into the woods, until our skirmishers met the enemy's skirmishers, who were slowly but steadily driven back. As we advanced the enemy fought more stubbornly, and two companies of the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers were ordered to report to Capt. Wilson, commanding skirmishing line, for purpose of strengthing and making connection with the Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry, who were moving up on our right flank. The skirmishers then advanced, followed by the line of battle close in the rear until we reached the Charles City road, where we were ordered to halt. Here we lay a short time, when the regiment received orders to return. We bivouacked for the night with the balance of the brigade in a corn-field near headquarters Tenth Army Corps. Casualties: Commissioned officers, wounded, 1; enlisted men, killed, 1; wounded, 5.

    On the morning of the 16th the Second Brigade, with the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers on the right, formed in line of battle and moved forward on the line and protecting the right flank of the Tenth Army Corps. About 11 a. m. a part of the Tenth Corps charged the enemy capturing the works on the left of his line. The enemy fell back into a deep ravine running in an oblique direction to their line of breast-works. The Second Brigade was moved forward by the left flank across the captured works, forming on the left by the file into line, the left regiment resting on the breast-works, the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers on the right of the One hundred and forty-first Pennsylvania, and the Ninety-third New York Volunteers on the right of the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, the line of battle running in an oblique direction to the breast-works, and parallel to the ravine in which the enemy were posted. The brigade being thus formed charged the enemy, driving him from the ravine. In this charge the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers captured and sent to the rear 11 prisoners. We held the ravine about thirty minutes, when the enemy succeeded in driving our support on the left back, and there being no troops on the right of our brigade (Second) the enemy came in on that flank, thus having a cross-fire on the brigade, and the Eighty-fourth, with the balance of the brigade, was compelled to fall back to the captured line of works, which by this time was occupied by troops of the Tenth Army Corps, and the Second Brigade was ordered a short distance to the rear to reform. While this was being done the Tenth Army Corps was driven or fell back and took up a new line of battle in rear of the line captured in the morning. The Second Brigade was placed on the right of a brigade of colored troops of the Tenth Corps, the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers being the extreme right regiment of the brigade. Soon after dark we received orders to withdraw and march a short distance to the rear into a line of breast-works and bivouac for the night. Casualties: Commissioned officers, missing, 1; enlisted men, killed, 1; wounded, 10; missing, 33.

    Respectfully, your obedient servant,

    GEORGE ZINN, Lieut. Col. Eighty-fourth Regt. Pennsylvania Vols., Cmdg. Regt.

    Capt. F. E. MARBLE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Second Brigade.

    Report of Capt. John E. Ross, Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations October 27.

    HDQRS. EIGHTY-FOURTH Regt. PENNSYLVANIA VOLS.,

      October 30, 1864.

      SIR: In compliance with circular of October 29, 1864, I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of this command in conjunction with the Second Brigade, Third Division, Second Corps:

    Having reached the Boydton turnpike road, the regiment was massed with the brigade in an open field. After remaining in this place about an hour, the regiment was ordered to take up its position in line of battle about one-quarter of a mile in advance of the above position, the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry being on our right, and the left resting on the Boydton turnpike road. We remained here about an hour under a severe artillery fire of the enemy, suffering the loss of one man wounded. Shortly after the fire of the enemy had ceased in our front, firing was heard on our right flank, which was found to be that of the enemy. Efforts were made to reform the regiment on a line facing the enemy, who were advancing on our right flank, but owing to the different orders given, the regiment could not be formed until the brigade commenced falling back in confusion. The men were rallied on the road running parallel with our first line of battle. A charge was made at this time, but owing to the confusion along the line we were again compelled to fall back. Slight breast-works were thrown up on the last above-mentioned road, where we lay with the balance of the brigade until about 9 p. m., when the brigade was ordered to retire on the road on which we had advanced in the morning.

    The casualties were as follows: 4 enlisted men wounded, 1 enlisted men missing in action, and 6 enlisted men taken prisoners, who afterward escaped.

    Respectfully, your obedient servant,

    JOHN R. ROSS, Capt., Eighty-fourth Regt. Pennsylvania Vols., Cmdg. Regt.

    Lieut. C. W. FORRESTER, Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Second Brigade.


    PENNSYLVANIA ONE HUNDRED and FORTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY (Three Years)

    One Hundred and Forty-seventh Infantry. - Cols., Ario Pardee, Jr., John Craig; Lieut.-Cols., Ario Pardee, Jr., John Craig; Majs., John Craig, William J. Mackey.  Cos. A, B, C, D, and E of this regiment were formerly Cos. L, M, N, O and P, of the 28th, (q. v.), and were transferred to the 147th in Sept., 1862; Cos. F, G and H were mustered in at Harrisburg, Pa., from Aug. 22 to Nov. 20, 1862, for a three years' term; Co. I was organized at Philadelphia on Oct. 10, 1863, and Co. K in Feb., 1864.   Co. K was formed from the men of the first five companies who did not reenlist for another term.  It was disbanded in March, 1864, and its members were assigned to the other companies.  The regiment was organized at Loudoun Heights, Va., Oct. 10, 1862, with Ario Pardee, Jr., as lieutenant-colonel, and John Craig, major.  On Jan. 27, 1864, Pardee was commissioned colonel.  The regiment moved from the vicinity of Harper's Ferry to Fairfax Court House just after the battle of Fredericksburg.  It shared in Burnside's "Mud March" in Jan., 1863, and was stationed at Acquia Creek landing until the opening of the Chancellorsville campaign.  As part of the 1st brigade (Col. Candy), 2nd division (Brig.-Gen. Geary), 12th corps (Maj.-Gen. Slocum), it took an honorable part in the battle of Chancellorsville, losing 94 killed, wounded and missing, including 3 officers killed and 4 wounded.  It arrived on the field of Gettysburg on the evening of July 1 and during the night went into position to the right of Round Top, but was posted during the next two days of the battle on Culp's hill, on the right of the line.  It suffered a loss of only 5 killed and l5 wounded, on account of the favorable nature of the ground occupied.  On its return to the Rappahannock it received 160 drafted men and a little later, with the 11th and 12th corps, it proceeded west and joined the Army of the Cumberland. It participated with some loss in the battles of Lookout mountain and Missionary ridge, and during the pursuit was active at Ringgold, after which it went into winter quarters at Wauhatchie.  On Dec. 29, 1863, a majority of the members re-enlisted and received the usual veteran furlough.  A large number of recruits were also received during the winter and early in May 1864, it moved with Gen. Sherman on the Atlanta campaign, being engaged at Dug gap, Resaca, New Hope Church, Kennesaw mountain and Peachtree creek.  In the last-named action, the regiment held its position at a critical point on the line with great tenacity and heroism and aided largely in saving its corps from serious disaster.  After sharing in the operations about Atlanta it marched to the sea and then north through the Carolinas. When Gen. Johnston surrendered in April it moved with the army to the vicinity of Washington, and was there mustered out on July 15, 1865.

    Chancellorsville, VA after battle report:

      No. 290.

      Report of Lieut. Col. Ario Pardee, Jr., One  hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry.

    CAMP NEAR AQUIA CREEK LANDING, VA., May 8, 1863.

      SIR: I have the honor to herewith submit the following report of the part taken by my regiment in the battle of Chancellorsville, Va., May 1, 2 and 3, accompanied by a list of the killed, wounded, and missing.*

    On the morning of May 1, the position assigned to my regiment was the right of the brigade, when we made a reconnaissance in force 2 miles south of Chancellorsville, Va., returning to our camp in the afternoon without loss. I was then assigned a position behind a breastwork hastily but strongly constructed of rails and small timber, having the Twenty-eighth Regt. Pennsylvania Volunteers on my left and the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry on my right. I threw out one company of my regiment, under Lieut. William H. Tourison, to the front as skirmishers. This officer maintained his position until sundown, when he was obliged to retire before a heavy force of the enemy but was at once replaced by a company under Capt. William J. Mackey, who held his position until relieved by parts of the Twenty-eighth Regt. Pennsylvania Volunteers and Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the afternoon of May 2.

    In the evening, as instructed, Capt. Joseph A. Moore, with his company, was sent out, but was soon ordered to his regiment. The enemy then advanced rapidly to the attack but were soon repulsed with loss.

    At 10 p.m. Lieut. William E. Goodman, with his company (D), advanced to within a short distance of the line of skirmishers of the enemy and held his position during the night. He captured 1 prisoner and rescued the colors of the One hundred and seventh Regt. Ohio Volunteer Infantry from the enemy.

      At sunrise, May 3, the skirmishers, under Lieut. Goodman, engaged those of the enemy, and fought them handsomely for nearly one hour, when he was obliged to fall back to the regiment, not, however, until his ammunition was nearly expended, his second lieutenant killed, himself wounded, and his company nearly overwhelmed with the superior force of the enemy. About this time the whole line of the brigade became engaged, the enemy having appeared on our right flank.

      We were then ordered to retire by the left flank, which movement was executed in good order. We formed in line of battle behind the artillery, near the brick hospital. From this position I received orders from brigadier-Gen. Geary to advance and take the intrenchments from which I had been driven. This was accomplished, the enemy being rapidly driven before us, and leaving a number of prisoners in our hands, which were sent to the rear. While in this position we were exposed to a galling fire of musketry, which enfiladed my whole line, as well as a heavy fire of artillery, from both of which I suffered severely.

      In this part of the action I lost 3 officers, killed and 2 wounded. Adjt. Samuel F. McKee was instantly killed,* as was Lieut.'s Smith and Leaming; Lieut.'s Bower and Black were wounded while cheering on the men. At this point Sergt. Samuel Henry, Company C, color-sergeant of the regiment, was instantly killed by a rifle ball.

      The troops on our right, overwhelmed by a superior force of the enemy, were obliged to fall back slowly. In the meantime the right wing of my regiment kept up a heavy fire on the advancing enemy, while the left wing fired but little (our own men being in their front), but were  exposed to a heavy fire of musketry, fired at the troops in our front and on our flank, as well as to a fire of artillery, which told fearfully on them. We were finally obliged to fall back to the Plank road to avoid being taken prisoners, when we reformed, and again advanced into the woods, from which we were again driven. I then received orders to fall back to the intrenchments southeast of the Plank road and reform my command, which I did. From this point I moved under orders, and reported to you in the rear of the command of Maj.-Gen. Sickles.

      I cannot but express through you my sincere thanks to Maj. Craig, by whom I was ably assisted; to Lieut. William E. Goodman, who was severely wounded, and, indeed, to all the officers and men of my command. Personal praise would be unjust where so many have  distinguished themselves unobserved by me.

      I am, sir, very respectfully,

      ARIO PARDEE, JR., Lieut. Col. 147th Regt. Pennsylvania Volunteers, Cmdg.

      Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH, Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

    Gettysburg after battle report: 

      Report of Lieut. Col. Ario Pardee, jr., One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry.

      Near Gettysburg, Pa., July 4, 1863.

      Sir: In compliance with circular of this day, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the One hundred and Forty-seventh Regt. Pennsylvania Volunteers in the actions  of July 2 and 3:

      My regiment was relieved from picket duty early on the morning of the 2d, and marched with the brigade to the position on the right of the line occupied by the First Army Corps.  In this position we remained until evening, when we marched with the brigade to a position near and east of the turnpike leading from Gettysburg to Baltimore.

      On the morning of the 3d, we marched to a point near the line of the previous day and toward the right of the line of the brigade, having on our right the Seventh Regt. Ohio Volunteers and on our left the Fifth Regt. Ohio Volunteers.  Soon after the line was formed, I was ordered by Gen. Geary, commanding division, to move forward with my regiment to a point which commanded the right of the line of intrenchments, and from which a view could be had of the movements of the enemy.  My regiment, soon after reaching its assigned position, became engaged with the skirmishers of the enemy, who were soon driven from their position.  Skirmishers were sent to the front and right flank, into the woods, from which they greatly harassed the enemy.

      At about 8 a. m. an attempt was made by the enemy to turn the right of the line of the intrenchments.  They boldly advanced to within about 100 yards without discovering my regiment.  I then ordered the regiment to fire, and broke their line.  They reformed again as a body and advanced.  Their advance was checked by the heavy fire they received, when they broke and ran.  I would have charged them, but had no support, and would not have been able to have held their position against the column in their rear.

      I have the honor to report that I held the position assigned me until late in the afternoon, when I was ordered to report to Gen. Wadsworth, of the First Corps.

      My loss has been, I am happy to say, slight, when my exposed position is taken into consideration.  The casualties are, 1 commissioned officer (Lieut. William H. Tourison, Company E) killed, 4 enlisted men killed, and 16 wounded.  A list of the casualties has already been furnished you.

      I am, sir, very respectfully,

      ARIO PARDEE, Jr., Lieut. Col. 147th Regt. Pennsylvania Vols., Comdg.

      Lieut. A. H. W. Creigh, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.


    Inventory Number: SWO 096