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  • Casey’s Infantry Tactics – Vol. I Inscribed by Captain Frank E. Gates 157th New York Infantry Wounded in Action at Gettysburg

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    Casey's Infantry Tactics – Vol. I

    Inscribed by Captain Frank E. Gates 157th New York Infantry

    Wounded in Action at the Battle of Gettysburg

     A letter from Lieut. FRANK E. GATES, of Canastota, to his parents, dated July 1st, 1863 from the Battlefield of Gettysburg was printed in the Utica Herald. Capt. FRANK, of Oneida, who is spoken of by Lieut. GATES, has since died. He says:

    "Our regiment (157th) suffered severely, but the boys stood remarkably well. Poor Captain Frank is badly wounded. When he fell, he called to me; I immediately went to him and gave him some water, and got some men to carry him from the battle-field. But I know he is, like myself, a prisoner. I don't feel able to write any more."

    The casualties of the 157th at Gettysburg were: 18 officers and 291 enlisted men, reducing regiment to 100 for duty.

    On 9/19/1862 he mustered into "G" Co. NY 157th Infantry, Gates served until the end of the war and he was mustered out on 7/10/1865 at Charleston, SC.  


    Frank E. Gates:

    Residence was not listed; 21 years old.

    Enlisted on 8/29/1862 as a Sergeant.

    On 9/19/1862 he mustered into "G" Co. NY 157th Infantry

    He was Mustered Out on 7/10/1865 at Charleston, SC

    He was listed as:

    * Wounded 7/2/1863 Gettysburg, PA

    Promotions:

    * 1st Sergt 1/1/1863 (Estimated day)

    * 2nd Lieut 2/10/1863

    * 1st Lieut 1/14/1864

    * Capt 1/22/1864 (As of Co. K)

    Intra Regimental Company Transfers:

    * 7/14/1864 from company G to company K

     

    NEW YORK ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY(Three Years)

    One Hundred and Fifty-seventh Infantry.-Cols., Philip P. Brown, Jr., James C. Carmichael; Lieut.-Cols., George Arrowsmith, James C.  Carmichael, Frank Place; Majs., James C. Carmichael, Frank Place, Leonard F. Briggs.

    This regiment, recruited in the counties of Madison and Cortland, was organized at Hamilton, and there mustered into the U. S. service for three years on Sept. 19, 1862.  It left the state on the 25th and on reaching Washington was assigned to the 1st brigade, 3d (Schurz's) division, 11th corps, with which it went into winter quarters at Stafford, Va.

    Its first battle was the disastrous one of Chancellorsville, where it lost 98 in killed, wounded and missing.  The regiment sustained a fearful loss at Gettysburg, where it was heavily engaged on the first two days of the battle and was highly praised for its gallantry.

    Lieut.-Col. Arrowsmith was killed on the first day.  The casualties of the 157th amounted to 6 officers and 46 men killed and mortally wounded; 6 officers and 137 men wounded; 6 officers and 106 men, missing, a total of 307.  Soon after the battle it was assigned to the 1st brigade of Schimmelfennig's (1st) division, same corps.

    This division was detached in August and ordered to Charleston harbor, where it became a part of the 10th corps, and during the remainder of 1863, the regiment, in the 2nd brigade, Gordon's division, 10th corps, was stationed on Folly and Morris islands, S.  C.  It participated in the siege of Fort Wagner and the various operations about Charleston harbor; was engaged at Seabrook and John's Islands in Feb., 1864, meeting with some losses, and was then ordered to Florida, where it remained until June, when it returned to Beaufort.

    During the remainder of its service it took part in the engagements at Honey Hill (loss, 32 killed and wounded), Boyd's point, Coosawhatchie, Deveaux neck (loss, 24), Tillafinny Station (loss, 20), all in 1864; in 1865 it fought at Manningsville, Dingle's mill (loss, 28), Singleton's plantation, Big Rafting creek and Statesburg.

    On July 10, 1865, it was mustered out at Charleston, S. C., under Col. Carmichael.  It lost by death during service, 7 officers and 90 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded; 2 officers and 104 men died of disease and other causes; total deaths, 203; total casualties, killed, wounded and missing, 533.


    Inventory Number: HIS 089