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  • Captain Bernard D. Searles, New York 94th Infantry

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    Captain Bernard D. Searles, New York 94th Infantry - Photo is inscribed to James Plummer also a member of the regiment.  inscription reads, " Bernard Searles  / Capt. of 94 Regt N.Y. Vol / Co C. / to comrade / L. J. Plummer


    Bernard D. Searles

    Residence was not listed; 44 years old.

    Enlisted on 10/16/1861 at Ellisburgh, NY as a 1st Lieutenant.

    On 3/20/1862 he was commissioned into "D" Co. NY 94th Infantry

    He was Mustered Out on 3/18/1863

     (MO on Consolidation)

    Promotions:

    * Capt 9/16/1862


    James Plummer:

    Residence was not listed; 18 years old.

    Enlisted on 10/28/1861 at Belleville, NY as a Private.

    On 2/13/1862 he mustered into "C" Co. NY 94th Infantry

    He was discharged on 11/12/1863


    NEW YORK NINETY-FOURTH INFANTRY (Three Years)

    Ninety-fourth Infantry.-Cols., Henry K. Viele, Adrian R. Root; Lieut.-Cols., Colvin Littlefield, John A. Kress, Samuel Moffatt; Majs., William R. Hanford, John A. Kress, D. C. Tomlinson, Samuel S.  Moffatt, John A. McMahon, Henry P. Fish, Byron Parsons.

    The 94th, the "Bell Rifles," recruited in Jefferson county, was mustered into the U. S. service at Sacket's Harbor, March 10, 1862, and left the state for Washington on the 18th.  It served in the defenses of Washington under Gen. Wadsworth, was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2nd division, Department of the Rappahannock in May, and to the 3d corps, Army of Virginia, June 26, with which it participated in Gen. Pope's Virginia campaign, losing 147 in killed, wounded and missing.

    On Sept. 12, with the same brigade and division, the regiment was attached to the 1st corps, was active at South mountain and Antietam, and in December at Fredericksburg.  The winter was passed in camp near Falmouth and in March, 1863, the regiment was consolidated into a battalion of five companies to which were added five companies of the 105th N. Y. infantry.

    The regiment served for a month as provost guard and in June 1863, returned to the 1st corps with its old brigade and division and suffered the heaviest loss of its service at Gettysburg-245 killed, wounded or missing.  It shared in the Mine Run fiasco and in December was ordered to Annapolis, where it became a part of the 8th corps.

    During the winter a large number of its members reenlisted and the regiment continued in service as a veteran organization.  In the Wilderness campaign it served with the 5th corps, being engaged at Cold Harbor, Totopotomy and White Oak swamp.  It moved with the Army of the Potomac to Petersburg and was closely engaged at the Weldon railroad, losing 178 killed, wounded or missing.

    On Aug. 10, 1864, the regiment was joined by the veterans and recruits of the 87th N. Y. infantry and remained on duty before Petersburg until the end of the siege after which it was active at Five Forks, and was present at Lee's surrender.  The 84th was mustered out at Washington, July 18, 1865, having lost 116 by death from wounds and 138 from other causes, of whom 37 died in imprisonment.  Maj. Fish was killed in action at Five Forks.

    NEW YORK NINETY-FOURTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY (VETERAN).

    Bell Rifles; Bell Jefferson Rifles; Sackett's Harbor Regiment. (Three Years)

    W. B. Camp received authority in October, 1861, as Colonel, to recruit a regiment of infantry.  He was succeeded, November 4, 1861, by Gen. John J. Viele.  This regiment was organized at Sackett's Harbor January 6, 1862, and there mustered in the service of the United States for three years, March 10, 1862, with Henry K. Viele as Colonel.  March 17, 1863, the regiment was consolidated into five companies, A, B, C, D and E, and received the 105th Infantry as its Companies F, G, H, I and K.  August 10, 1864, about 100 men of the 97th Infantry were transferred to it.  At the expiration of its term of enlistment the men entitled thereto were discharged, and the regiment retained in service.

    The companies were recruited in Jefferson county, and the regiment left the State March 18, 1862; it served in General Wadsworth's command, Military District of Washington, from March, 1862; in 1st Brigade, 2d Division, Department of Rappahannock, from May, 1862; in same brigade and division, 3d Corps, Army of Virginia, from June 26, 1862; in same brigade and division, 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, from September 12, 1862; in 1st Brigade, same division and corps, from December, 1862; as Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, from May, 1863; in 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, again from June, 1863; in the District of Annapolis, Md., 8th Corps, from December, 1863; in the 3d Brigade, 4th Division, 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac, from May 26, 1864; in the 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 5th Corps, from May 30, 1864; in the 1st Brigade, 3d Division, 5th Corps, from June, 1864; in the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, 5th Corps, from June 11, 1864; in the 3d Brigade, same division and corps, from November, 1864; and it was honorably discharged and mustered out, commanded by Col. Adrian R. Root, July 18, 1865, near Washington, D.

    NEW YORK NINETY-FOURTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY (VETERAN).

    Bell Rifles; Bell Jefferson Rifles; Sackett's Harbor Regiment.

    W. B. Camp received authority in October, 1861, as Colonel, to recruit a regiment of infantry.  He was succeeded, November 4, 1861, by Gen. John J. Viele.  This regiment was organized at Sackett's Harbor January 6, 1862, and there mustered in the service of the United States for three years, March 10, 1862, with Henry K. Viele as Colonel.  March 17, 1863, the regiment was consolidated into five companies, A, B, C, D and E, and received the 105th Infantry as its Companies F, G, H, I and K.  August 10, 1864, about 100 men of the 97th Infantry were transferred to it.  At the expiration of its term of enlistment the men entitled thereto were discharged, and the regiment retained in service. The companies were recruited in Jefferson county, and the regiment left the State March 18, 1862; it served in General Wadsworth's command, Military District of Washington, from March, 1862; in 1st Brigade, 2d Division, Department of Rappahannock, from May, 1862; in same brigade and division, 3d Corps, Army of Virginia, from June 26, 1862; in same brigade and division, 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, from September 12, 1862; in 1st Brigade, same division and corps, from December, 1862; as Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, from May, 1863; in 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac, again from June, 1863; in the District of Annapolis, Md., 8th Corps, from December, 1863; in the 3d Brigade, 4th Division, 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac, from May 26, 1864; in the 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 5th Corps, from May 30, 1864; in the 1st Brigade, 3d Division, 5th Corps, from June, 1864; in the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, 5th Corps, from June 11, 1864; in the 3d Brigade, same division and corps, from November, 1864; and it was honorably discharged and mustered out, commanded by Col. Adrian R. Root, July 18, 1865, near Washington, D. C.

    2nd Bull Run, VA after action report:

    No. 38.

    Report of Lieut. Col. Calvin Littlefield, Ninety-fourth New York Infantry, of the battle of Bull Run.

    CAMP NEAR MECHANICSVILLE, MD.,

    September 10, 1862

    DEAR SIR: I would respectfully report, in accordance to Gen. Orders, No. 40, that on the 30th of August, 1862, the Ninety-fourth Regiment New York Volunteers went onto the battle-field of Bull Run at about 4.30 o'clock p.m.  We were ordered to the support of a battery occupying the right of the brigade, and immediately after having taken this position we were ordered to move by the left flank to the left of the brigade. Having passed tow regiments we were then ordered to change the direction of our line by filing to the left, and while in the act of forming our line in the new direction we were ordered by Gen. Tower to fire upon the enemy, who had now made their appearance in a corn field directly in our front. The Eighty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers having in the meantime changed their front prevented our firing, as but three companies of our regiment had passed from their rear. Gen. Tower then ordered that these three companies should advance to the brow of a hill upon our right, which order was promptly obeyed. While these three companies were engaging the enemy at that point the remaining seven advanced in the original direction, and engaged the enemy on the extreme left of the brigade. This position we held until flanked by the enemy. Finding ourselves in the midst of a cross-fire, and suffering severely therefrom, we obeyed an order previously given to retire.

    The list of casualties has already been rendered.*

    I remain, yours, with respect and esteem.

    C. LITTLEFIELD, Lieut.-Col., Commanding Regiment.

    Col. CHRISTIAN, Commanding Second Brigade.

    Antietam after battle report:

    Report of Lieut. Samuel A. Moffett, Ninety-fourth New York Infantry, of the battles of South Mountain and Antietam.

    HDQRS. NINETY-FOURTH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLS.,

    Saturday, September 20, 1862.

    DEAR SIR: In compliance with general orders, I would respectfully report that on Sunday, September 14, our regiment marched from Frederick to South Mountain, arriving at that point at about 6 o'clock p. m. We continued the march until part way up the mountain, when we formed in line of battle, and for a short time remained at a halt. Very soon after we were ordered to March by the front toward the summit, which was continued but a short distance, when we were ordered to move by the left flank. In this direction, we moved until far enough to join the right of our brigade upon the left of the First Brigade, when we were again ordered to move to the front, hanging our direction by the right flank. We then continued our advance to  the front until we occupied our position during the engagement, our regiment being upon the extreme left of the brigade. During the action Capt. D. C. Tomlinson was wounded in the back of his neck; also one private of Company D. Number of killed, 2.

    Evening having so far set in, the engagement was soon brought to a close.  We laid on our arms during the night. Monday, 15th, finding the enemy had retreated, we began a march in pursuit, which was continued to Deedysville, where we encamped for the night. 16th, during the latter part of the day, we again took up our march, and continued it to the battle-ground near Sharpsburg, Md., arriving there at about 11 p. m., when we rested on our arms until the morning of the 17th, between 5 and 6 a. m., when we moved from the position we then occupied to another piece of woods, and immediately formed in line of battle and marched to the front, where our men were engaged for little more than one hour. Our position occupied during this engagement was next to the extreme left of the brigade.

    S. A. MOFFETT, Lieut., Commanding Regiment.

    Col. LYLE, Commanding Second Brigade.


    Inventory Number: CDV 240